The Daily 202: Democrats struggling to activate black voters in the Alabama Senate race

The Daily 202: Democrats struggling to activate black voters in the Alabama Senate race

THE BIG IDEA:

MONROEVILLE, Ala.—For Democrats to win a Senate race in a state as red as Alabama, which President Trump carried by 28 points last year, everything needs to break their way. Doug Jones must persuade significant numbers of Republicans to back him in next week’s special election over Roy Moore, but victory also requires a level of black turnout not seen since Barack Obama’s 2008 election. Even with so much working in his favor, that remains a very tall order.

Two dozen interviews with African Americans on Thursday in this rural town of 6,500 showed that Jones still has his work cut out for him. The conversations revealed deep distaste for Trump but also disillusionment with the political process.

Paulette Williams, 62, will vote for Jones, but she lamented that most people she knows are apathetic and predicted that he will not win. She said Republicans are going to pull the lever for Moore despite allegations of sexual misconduct against him, but too many Democrats can’t be bothered.

“People died to have the right to vote. Now that people have the privilege, they waste it,” said Williams, who retired after 33 years as a technical inspector at a pulp and paper mill. “People talk more about the Alabama-Auburn game than politics. Everything President Obama implemented, Trump is trying to reverse: civil rights, equal rights, helping the poor, all of it. But they’re more interested in Alabama versus Auburn than what’s going wrong in the country.”

Monroeville was Harper Lee’s hometown, and she used it as the model for Maycomb in “To Kill a Mockingbird,” her classic novel about racial injustice in the South during the Jim Crow era. Midway between the port in Mobile and the capital in Montgomery, the city is part of what’s known as the Black Belt. The region was originally named for its dark top soil but is now known for heavy concentrations of African Americans and persistent poverty. Turnout in this region historically lags the rest of the state.

African Americans account for 27 percent of Alabama’s population. Trump carried Monroe County last year with 57 percent to Hillary Clinton’s 42 percent. Reflecting deep polarization along racial lines, the county’s population is 55 percent white and 42 percent black. Each of the 10 whites I talked with here yesterday said they plan to vote for Moore.

The  Washington Post-Schar School poll, which gave Jones a narrow lead that is within the margin of error, found that he has the support of 93 percent of blacks and 33 percent of whites statewide. The open question, though, isn’t whether African Americans will support the Democrat. It’s whether they’ll go to the polls.

Charles Robbins Kidd, 77, said he thinks both Trump and Moore try to capitalize on racial division for political advantage, which makes him bearish on Jones’s odds. “He might win. I hope he wins. I’m going to vote for him. … But I know it’ll be hard,” said Kidd. “It’ll be so hard for Doug Jones to win because there are so many white folks against black folks. I don’t know why, but they are.”

Kidd operated a dye machine at a textile mill. But he quit to paint houses, he said, when he realized that he was getting paid less than white men for the same work. “I don’t know why white folks are so against black folks. Black folks never did anything but work hard,” said Kidd, who wore an elegant gray hat with a feather and has two gold front teeth. “They’re tough around here on black folks.”

Most of the folks I talked with in the Monroeville town square, directly across the street from the old courthouse described vividly in “Mockingbird,” said they are depressed about the direction of the country but feel powerless to do anything about it. For the first time in a long time, their votes could have a real impact on national politics. But they don’t see it that way.

John Dewayne Richardson is an unemployed construction worker with three kids. His dad drove him to the post office yesterday in a red pick-up truck so that he could check on his claim for jobless benefits. It got rejected, he complained, because his last employer didn’t fill out required paperwork. Richardson said he keeps hearing on TV that the economy is doing well. “But I haven’t seen a change,” he said. Now he’s thinking about moving out of state to find work.

The 35-year-old hasn’t paid close attention to the election but says he’d still like to vote next week. He believes George W. Bush stole the 2000 election with shenanigans in Florida, and he thinks Republicans will probably steal this election if Moore doesn’t get the most votes. “Do you get where I’m coming from?” he asked. “People don’t vote because they don’t feel their votes matter because nothing is going to change. What difference is it going to make?”

Jessica Nettles, 28, voted for the first time in 2008, so that she could support Obama, but she stayed home in 2012 because she felt he had been coopted by Wall Street. She didn’t vote in 2016 either because she did not see any meaningful difference between Trump and Clinton. If she had been forced to vote, she said, she would have written in Bernie Sanders.

“I don’t vote because I don’t feel like there’s a purpose,” she said on her lunch break. “I feel like Republicans and Democrats all work together. I just feel like it’s all one big set-up. … Nothing changes. It’s the same thing no matter who is in power. … All hope goes out the window when you realize what’s really going on. At the end of the day, the real players in this country are not going to let the people make changes.”

— Jones is working hard to galvanize the African American community in the final days. As a U.S. attorney, he successfully prosecuted two Ku Klux Klan members for their role in the 1963 Birmingham church bombing that killed four black girls. For his closing argument, Jones has contrasted his work on that case with the allegations that Moore improperly pursued teenage girls when he was an assistant district attorney in his 30s. One woman has said she was 14 when Moore touched her sexually. “Men who hurt little girls should go to jail, not the United States Senate,” Jones, 63, said in a speech Tuesday. (Moore, now 70, has denied any wrongdoing.)

In mailers to black households, the Jones campaign has highlighted the allegations and suggested that an African American man would not be treated the same way if he was accused of similar sexual misconduct.

Without prompting, several black voters I interviewed praised Jones for going after the KKK. “I pray that we get some Christian people that just do what’s right and vote for Doug Jones,” said Edith Ruffin, 66, who recently retired from a plant in Monroeville that manufactures bras. “It’s not that I dislike the other candidate, but I like what he did for the little black girls in Birmingham. He got justice for them.”

There are other important contrasts between the candidates. An African American man asked Moore during a campaign event when he thought America was last “great.” “I think it was great at the time when families were united — even though we had slavery — they cared for one another,” he said in September, according to the Los Angeles Times. “Our families were strong. Our country had a direction.”

Moore has twice been removed from the Alabama Supreme Court for refusing to respect the judicial process. He once opposed removing segregationist language from the state constitution, he says Muslims should not be allowed to serve in Congress, and he is a birther. Trump has now conceded, at least publicly, that Obama was a natural-born citizen, but Moore has continued to say – even after the 2016 election – that he still doesn’t think so.

Jones spoke last Friday in a black church to mark the anniversary of Rosa Parks’s 1955 arrest for refusing to give up her seat on the bus. Then he marched Saturday in Selma’s Christmas parade and visited nine predominantly African American churches in Tuscaloosa on Sunday. He’s held several rallies at historically black colleges, including Tuskegee University, Alabama State University and Alabama A&M. He’s been a regular guest on radio programs popular with African Americans.

This weekend, surrogates are mobilizing across the black belt and in urban areas like Birmingham to make the case for voting. Rep. Terri A. Sewell (D-Ala.) has been organizing a slate of Sunday campaign events that will feature Sen. Cory Booker (D-N.J.), Rep. John Lewis (D-Ga.) and former Gov. Deval Patrick (D-Mass.).

“Our campaign is running the largest, most active get-out-the-vote program Alabama has seen in a generation,” said Jones campaign spokesman Sebastian Kitchen.

— Why Jones still has a shot: Moore has routinely under-performed compared to other Republicans. As part of an excellent deep dive into the political geography of Alabama, our Darla Cameron, Dan Keating and Kim Soffen discovered that lots of Republicans are accustomed to not voting for him. Moore won his 2012 race for chief justice of the state Supreme Court by just four points, for example, on the same day Mitt Romney won by 22 points.

MORE ON AMERICA, DIVIDED:

— Rep. John Lewis (D-Ga.) and Rep. Bennie Thompson (D-Miss.) said they will skip celebrating the opening of a Mississippi civil rights museum this weekend because Trump plans to attend, saying the president’s “attendance and hurtful policies are an insult to the people portrayed” in the museum. “After careful consideration and conversations with church leaders, elected officials, civil rights activists, and many citizens of our congressional districts, we have decided not to attend or participate in the opening of the Mississippi Civil Rights Museum,” the two said in a statement. Sarah Huckabee Sanders called their cancellations “unfortunate”: Trump “hopes others will join him in recognizing that the movement was about removing barriers and unifying Americans of all backgrounds.”

— Many black residents in the state say Trump’s presidency has revived troubles of the past. Marc Fisher reports: “Three miles from the Mississippi Civil Rights Museum, over rutted roads, past littered lots, abandoned houses, and shuttered plants and warehouses … [black residents] of this struggling capital city say that after nearly a year of the Trump presidency, they have a definitive answer to the question candidate Trump posed when he spoke at a rally in Jackson in August last year. ‘What do you have to lose?’ Trump asked, making a quixotic and ultimately failed bid for black votes to a nearly all-white crowd.” Now, their answers here are resounding:

  • “We’re losing a lot,” said auto shop owner Pete McElroy. “Losing Obamacare. Losing money. … Mostly, we’re losing respect. No way you can evade that. The way he speaks, the racists feel like they can say anything they want to us.”
  • “It’s getting worse, not better, not just for black Americans but for poor whites, too,” said taxi driver Burrell Brooks said. “You see the Confederate banner back up, the whole Confederate monuments thing. This country is going back to more segregation, and a museum makes people think that’s all history, that’s all fixed.”

WHILE YOU WERE SLEEPING:

— The latest jobs report showed that the unemployment rate stayed at a strong 4.1 percent. U.S. employers added 228,000 jobs last month, slightly outpacing Wall Street’s expectations. But some of the industries producing the most jobs also offer some of the lowest wages. The home health aide industry, where workers are paid only $22,000 a year on average, will create an estimated 425,600 jobs by 2026. (Danielle Paquette)

— Rep. Trent Franks (R-Ariz.), one of the most socially conservative members of Congress, announced his resignation after asking two female staffers if they would bear his children as surrogates. Mike DeBonis reports: “Franks’s announcement came as the House Ethics Committee said it would create a special subcommittee to investigate Franks for conduct ‘that constitutes sexual harassment and/or retaliation for opposing sexual harassment.’ His resignation, which Franks said is effective Jan. 31, will end the ethics investigation. Franks said in his statement that the investigation concerns his ‘discussion of surrogacy with two previous female subordinates, making each feel uncomfortable.’ He denied ever having ‘physically intimidated, coerced, or had, or attempted to have, any sexual contact with any member of my congressional staff.’” He added: “I deeply regret that my discussion of this option and process in the workplace caused distress.”

— Speaker Paul Ryan (R-Wis.) released a statement saying he asked Franks to resign.

— Britain and the E.U. reached an agreement on their divorce proceedings. Michael Birnbaum reports: “The bargain came as May compromised on the biggest challenges facing Britain during its split. A disagreement over borders between Northern Ireland and Ireland nearly derailed the deal this week. British factions have also tangled over the amount of money they will have to pay as they leave the [E.U.] as well as who will guarantee the rights of E.U. citizens after the divorce. On those issues and a host of others, Britain has been forced to capitulate to the European Union after saying earlier this year that it held the upper hand in the negotiations.”

GET SMART FAST:​​

  1. Wildfires continued to ravage Southern California for a fourth day, tearing across Ventura to San Diego at dizzying speeds leaving scenes of destruction in their wake. Meanwhile, new mandatory evacuations were ordered; major roadways were shut down, and authorities warned dangers could continue through the week’s end. “We are a long way from being out of this weather event,” the director of Cal Fire said. “In some cases, the worst could be yet to come.” (Scott Wilson, Mark Berman and Eli Rosenberg)
  2. Russia’s foreign minister claimed North Korea is prepared to open direct talks with the United States about their nuclear standoff. Sergei Lavrov said he passed the message on to Rex Tillerson when the two met this week in Vienna. (The Guardian)

  3. Trump’s decision to recognize Jerusalem as Israel’s capital sparked violent clashes between Palestinian protesters and Israeli troops, leaving at least 51 Palestinians injured as U.S. missions in the region braced for more conflict. The violence comes one day before Hamas is expected to hold a “day of rage.” (Loveday Morris and Ruth Eglash)
  4. Sarah Huckabee Sanders confirmed Trump would undergo a full physical early next year and release the results. The day before, Trump’s slurred speech during his Jerusalem announcement spurred concern and conspiracy theories about his health. (Philip Rucker)

  5. The former South Carolina police officer who shot and killed Walter Scott was sentenced to 20 years in prison. Scott, a black man, was unarmed when officer Michael Slager pulled him over in a traffic stop in 2015. (Mark Berman)
  6. Two students were killed after a gunman opened fire at a high school in Aztec, N.M. Authorities have said little about the shooting, but confirmed the gunman is dead and that none of the school’s other 1,000 students were injured. (Moriah Balingit)
  7. Meanwhile, a new study found that a surge in gun sales following the Sandy Hook shooting — prompted by fears of stricter gun laws — caused a “significant” jump in accidental firearm deaths. Researchers estimate the 3 million firearms sold after the elementary school massacre caused 60 more accidental gun deaths than would not have occurred otherwise. One-third of the victims were children. (William Wan)
  8. Former Tennessee governor Phil Bredesen (D) officially launched his Senate campaign, offering his party a path (albeit an extremely narrow one) to the Senate majority next year. But some doubt his chances of victory given Tennessee’s increasingly Republican leanings since Bredesen last held office. (New York Times)
  9. Joe Arpaio is “seriously, seriously, seriously considering running for the U.S. Senate.” The former sheriff, who was convicted of criminal contempt of court and then pardoned by Trump, said he has been eyeing Sen. Jeff Flake’s seat. (The Daily Beast)

  10. Amazon has launched a new $250 door lock that connects to the Internet and allows its deliverers to drop off packages directly inside your home. But is it genius or just plain creepy? Reviews so far are mixed. (Geoffrey A. Fowler gave it a trial run.)
  11. A team of scientists have just discovered the oldest, most distant black hole known to man. It’s 13 billion light-years away, 800 million times more massive than the sun and could offer clues to the enigmatic early years of the universe. (Sarah Kaplan)
  12. And speaking of discoveries: A record-setting, 17-foot Burmese python was killed last week in the Florida Everglades. The terrifying creature boasted rows of razor-sharp teeth, weighed in at more than 130 pounds and was roughly the size of three human adults. (Lindsey Bever)

MEN BEHAVING BADLY:

— Sen. Al Franken (D-Minn.) announced he will resign from the Senate in the “coming weeks,” yielding to pressure from his Democratic colleagues after multiple women accused him of inappropriate touching. Franken has continued to deny the allegations. Ed O’Keefe, Elise Viebeck and Karen Tumulty report: “The former rising Democratic star used his resignation speech to take aim at [Trump and Moore], who have not been forced aside despite facing arguably more serious allegations of sexual misconduct. ‘There is some irony in the fact that I am leaving while a man who has bragged on tape about his history of sexual assault sits in the Oval Office, and a man who has repeatedly preyed on young girls campaigns for the Senate with the full support of his party,’ Franken said in a speech on the Senate floor. … Franken called the reckoning an ‘important moment’ that is ‘long overdue,’ but he denied engaging in behavior that disrespected or took advantage of women. ‘I know there’s been a very different picture of me painted over the last few weeks, but I know who I really am,’ he said. ‘I know in my heart that nothing I have done as a senator — nothing — has brought dishonor on this institution.’”

— Some of Franken’s accusers were not satisfied with his remarks. “His speech was about his experience, his grief, his embarrassment and his pain and had nothing to do with the female experience of what he did against his accusers,” said Tina Dupuy, a former Democratic Hill staffer who accused Franken of groping her in 2009. “It was a very un-empathetic speech to the women who told him and the public that it was not okay. There was no apology.” (Kimberly Kindy)

— “Franken’s departure [comes at an] inflection point for Democrats,” Karen Tumulty writes in a smart analysis. “Shut out of power completely, they are looking for a way out of the wilderness. Toward that end, getting rid of Franken was both a moral and political calculation. It was the Democrats’ strongest declaration yet that they — unlike the Republicans — are willing to sacrifice their own in the interest of staking out the high ground. … On the other hand, Trump’s reaction to allegations against him has been to brand as liars the women who have made them. It worked, as evidenced by the outcome of the election. In Alabama, Moore has taken the same approach.”

Avi Selk explains how Franken’s Senate career began with a controversy in which he was accused of misogyny: “[I]n late May of [2008] — less than two weeks before a state convention in which he hoped Minnesota Democrats would choose him as their Senate nominee — Republicans began publicizing an article he had written for Playboy magazine in 2000. It was called ‘Porn-O-Rama!’ — a sci-fi story in which Franken visited a fictional university to have sex with a doctor in some sort of virtual reality machine. The doctor was an ‘extremely attractive blonde’ with ‘legs that won’t quit and firm but ample breasts,’ he wrote. ‘She seemed to be coming on to me.’ … As the state convention approached, more and more women demanded that he apologize — and not only Republicans.” Franken finally did apologize, but he wrote years later that he never actually felt sorry for having written the article.

— The Minnesota senator found some unlikely defenders on Fox News, where Newt Gingrich described the Democratic push for Franken to resign as a “lynch mob.” Callum Borchers writes: “The former House speaker argued that Democrats’ mind-set is, ‘Let’s just lynch him because when we are done, we will be so pure.’ Gingrich’s point about purity is at the center of Fox News’s commentary on Franken. The contention is that Democrats are not acting nobly but are merely trying to claim the moral high ground on the issue of sexual misconduct so that they will have standing to denounce Republicans such as Roy Moore and President Trump, who face accusations of their own.”

  • Sen. Bill Cassidy (R-La.) said Franken “didn’t have to resign.” “There’s no due process for Franken,” Cassidy said. “[Franken] decided to accept being drummed out. … I’m not defending him. You just can’t help but observe what I’m saying is true.” Cassidy added, in the case of Moore, “I, among others, have withdrawn my endorsement for Mr. Moore. … But it’s up to him to decide whether or not to accept that.”

— Senators are stepping up their scrutiny of sexual harassment complaints and taxpayer-funded settlements. Michelle Ye Hee Lee reports: “Sen. Tim Kaine (D-Va.) on Thursday joined two Senate committees in seeking records of complaints and settlements from the Office of Compliance, which carries out the required counseling and mediation process for legislative employees filing workplace claims. Kaine said he would publicly release any data he receives. In the past week, the House started releasing limited data on claims and settlements, without identifying any accusers or the lawmakers said to be involved. Even less is known about the number of workplace complaints involving Senate offices and how much public money was used to resolve them[.] … It’s unclear whether the Office of Compliance will provide any information in response to Kaine’s request.”

— The House Ethics Committee formed a subcommittee to investigate the sexual misconduct allegations against Rep. Blake Farenthold (R-Tex.). Michelle Ye Hee Lee reports: “The committee initially launched an investigation into Farenthold in September 2015, but it was ‘significantly delayed’ because the committee could not get ‘key witnesses other than Representative Farenthold’ to testify, according to the committee’s statement. His former communications director, Lauren Greene, in 2014 accused Farenthold of making sexually charged comments designed to gauge whether she was interested in a sexual relationship. … The House Ethics Committee has requested Greene to cooperate with the investigation and appear before the panel. Prior to coming forward, Greene had declined, wanting to move on from the matter. But she has now agreed to cooperate with the investigation[.]”

— Rep. Mia Love (R-Utah) called on Farenthold to resign, becoming one of the first House Republicans to do so. “I don’t think he thinks he’s done anything wrong, but the fact is, someone was paid off,” Love said. “Where he may not feel like his behavior was inappropriate, obviously somebody did. Obviously people felt uncomfortable.” (CNN)

— Former congressman Harold Ford Jr. (D-Tenn.) was fired by Morgan Stanley following an HR investigation into accusations of misconduct. One woman who was interviewed as part of the HR probe separately told HuffPost that Ford harassed her and “forcibly grabbed” her during an event in Manhattan several years ago, leading her to seek aid from a building security guard.

THERE’S A BEAR IN THE WOODS:

— A top Russian social media company made several overtures to Trump’s campaign in 2016, urging it to create a page on the website as an effort to appeal to Russian-Americans. Rosalind S. Helderman, Anton Troianovski and Tom Hamburger report: “The executive at Vkontakte, or VK, Russia’s equivalent to Facebook, emailed Donald Trump Jr. and social media director Dan Scavino in January and again in November of last year, offering to help promote Trump’s campaign to its nearly 100 million users[.] … ‘It will be the top news in Russia,’ Konstantin Sidorkov, who serves as VK’s director of partnership marketing, wrote on Nov. 5, 2016. While Scavino expressed interest in learning more at one point, it is unclear whether the campaign pursued the idea. An attorney for Trump Jr. said his client forwarded a pitch about the concept to Scavino early in the year and could not recall any further discussion about it.” 

— The overture with VK was brokered by British music producer Rob Goldstone, who also helped arrange the June 2016 Trump Tower meeting between a Russian lawyer and Donald Trump Jr. Goldstone is slated to meet with both the Senate and House intelligence panels for closed-door meetings as early as next week. (CNN)

— The emails also show Goldstone sent follow-up messages after the meeting with Don Jr. at Trump Tower. Don Jr. had previously denied there was any follow-up to the meeting. CNN’s Jim Sciutto, Manu Raju and Jeremy Herb report: The emails “were discovered by congressional investigators and raised at Wednesday’s classified hearing with Trump Jr., who said he could not recall the interactions, several sources said. None of the newly disclosed emails were sent directly to Trump Jr. They are bound to be a subject during Goldstone’s closed-door meetings with the House and Senate intelligence panels[.] … In one email dated June 14, 2016, Goldstone forwarded a CNN story on Russia’s hacking of DNC emails to his client, Russian pop star Emin Agalarov, and Ike Kaveladze, a Russian who attended the meeting along with Trump Jr., Trump’s son-in-law Jared Kushner and Manafort, describing the news as ‘eerily weird’ given what they had discussed at Trump Tower five days earlier.”

— During a House hearing, Republicans repeatedly accused the FBI of harboring anti-Trump bias. Devlin Barrett and Ellen Nakashima report: “[FBI Director Christopher] Wray spent the morning being grilled at a hearing of the House Judiciary Committee about how FBI personnel — particularly a senior counterintelligence agent now the subject of an internal ethics investigation — handled sensitive probes of Trump and his former political rival, Hillary Clinton. … Republicans at the hearing said Wray needed to prove to them that the FBI was proceeding without picking political favorites. … In a remarkable moment, Rep. Louie Gohmert (R-Tex.) read aloud from a list of FBI officials, asking Wray after each name whether that person had shown political bias in their work. After every name, Wray vouched for the person’s character, though he acknowledged he did not know everyone Gohmert named.”

— Meanwhile, the House Ethics Committee ended its investigation of Intelligence Committee Chair Devin Nunes (R-Calif.), clearing him of any wrongdoing and potentially allowing him to retake control of his committee’s Russia probe. Karoun Demirjian reports: “The Ethics Committee said Thursday that ‘classification experts in the intelligence community’ determined that when Nunes suggested to the press in March that Trump transition-team members’ identities may have been improperly revealed in foreign surveillance reports, he was not disclosing classified information. … Nunes welcomed the news but criticized the committee in a statement for taking eight months to clear him of allegations that he argued ‘were obviously frivolous and were rooted in politically motivated complaints filed against me by left-wing activist groups.’” He would not say whether he intended to resume his full duties as chairman of the panel’s Russia investigation.

— Director of National Intelligence Dan Coats is calling for tighter restrictions on “unmasking” Americans in intelligence reports, a practice criticized by Trump and his allies after campaign officials – including Michael Flynn – were unmasked by Obama administration officials. Reuters’s Warren Strobel and Jonathan Landay report: “In a Nov. 30 letter sent to [Devin Nunes] and other top lawmakers, [Coats] said the new unmasking policy is due by Jan. 15. … Coats wrote that the new policy will reinforce existing procedures that ‘make clear that IC (intelligence community) elements may not engage in political activity, including dissemination of U.S. person identities to the White House, for the purpose of affecting the political process of the United States.’”

— Paul Manafort’s attorneys acknowledged his role in editing an op-ed for a Ukrainian newspaper but sidestepped the question of whether he drafted it with an associate known to have Kremlin ties. Spencer S. Hsu reports: “Manafort’s defense argued in a court filing to a federal judge in Washington that Manafort’s work on the op-ed piece for an English-language newspaper in Kiev defending himself did not violate a court gag order because it would not likely bias potential jurors in any U.S. trial.”

— Opinions on the Russia investigation are deeply divided along party lines, a new Pew Research Center poll finds. Pew reports: “While just 30% of Americans think senior Trump officials definitely had improper contacts with Russia during the campaign, a majority (59%) thinks such contacts definitely or probably occurred; 30% think they definitely or probably did not happen. In views of Mueller’s investigation, 56% are very or somewhat confident he will conduct the probe fairly.

The divide: “Only about a quarter of Republicans and Republican-leaning independents (26%) say Trump officials definitely or probably had improper contacts with Russia during the campaign; 82% of Democrats and Democratic leaners think there were improper contacts – with 49% saying they definitely took place. About two-thirds of Democrats (68%) and 44% Republicans say they are at least somewhat confident Mueller’s investigation will be conducted fairly.”

— But a reporter for McClatchy pointed this out about the poll:

SHUTDOWN AVERTED . . . FOR NOW:

— Congress passed a short-term spending deal — temporarily staving off a government shutdown even as lawmakers are bracing for a more heated fight in the weeks ahead. Mike DeBonis reports: “Trump has indicated that he will sign the deal, preventing a government stoppage that had been set to take effect at 12:01 a.m. Saturday. The deal does not resolve numerous debates over domestic spending, immigration and funding for the military that brought the government to the brink of partial closure, leaving party leaders with a new Dec. 22 deadline to keep the government open. … [Earlier Thursday] congressional leaders of both parties went to the White House [to] begin talks with Trump on a long-term spending pact. But there are clear obstacles to any deal.”

  • Freedom Caucus Chairman Mark Meadows warned that any long-term deal risked Republican revolt. “It takes two bodies to put something into law, and the president’s agreement to a caps deal does not mean that it is fiscally the best thing for the country,” Meadows said. “I want to avoid a headline that says [Trump’s] administration just passed the highest spending levels in U.S. history.”
  • Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) laid out a list of Democratic demands, including funding for veterans and the opioid crisis, and a bill to grant permanent legal status for “dreamers.” She sent mixed signals on how far Democrats would go to secure their priorities, arguing “Democrats are not willing to shut government down” but they “will not leave” Washington for the holidays without a “dreamers” fix.

TRUMP’S AGENDA:

— The Justice Department is reportedly moving toward an investigation of Planned Parenthood. The Daily Beast’s Betsy Woodruff reports: “The head of Justice’s office of legislative affairs has sent a letter to the Senate Judiciary Committee asking for documents from its investigation of Planned Parenthood’s fetal tissue practices. The Daily Beast reviewed the letter, which says the requested documents are ‘for investigative use.’ … The Justice Department’s request refers to a report that the Senate Judiciary Committee Republicans released last December, called ‘Human Fetal Tissue Research: Context and Controversy.’ That report discusses how biomedical research corporations contracted with Planned Parenthood affiliates for fetal tissue. … It called for the Justice Department to investigate the matter. At the time, Planned Parenthood said [the] report did not demonstrate any wrongdoing.”

— Only 21 of the country’s 34 Republican governors signed a letter calling on Congress to pass tax cuts. John Wagner reports: Of the 13 GOP governors who didn’t sign on, “[a]t least a handful object on policy grounds to parts of the legislation, while others appear to be sensitive to home-state politics — or some combination of both. Several, for instance, preside over traditionally Democratic states, where the Republican tax legislation is particularly unpopular and where many residents could take a hit from provisions that curb the current practice of allowing state and local taxes to be deducted on federal filings.”

— BuzzFeed News published Blackwater founder Erik Prince’s pitch to the administration on privatizing the war in Afghanistan. BuzzFeed’s Aram Roston reports: “One surprising element is the commercial promise Prince envisions: that the US will get access to Afghanistan’s rich deposits of minerals such as lithium, used in batteries; uranium; magnesite; and ‘rare earth elements,’ critical metals used in high technology from defense to electronics. One slide estimates the value of mineral deposits in Helmand province alone at $1 trillion. … The presentation makes it plain that Prince intends to fund the effort through these rich deposits. His plan, one slide says, is ‘a strategic mineral resource extraction funded effort that breaks the negative security economic cycle.’ The slides also say that mining could provide jobs to Afghans.”

— Former Census officials and statisticians are airing concerns over Trump’s reported pick to serve as deputy director of the bureau. Tara Bahrampour writes: “Reports had surfaced saying the White House planned to install as the bureau’s deputy director Thomas Brunell, a political science professor with scant managerial experience who is best known for his testimony as an expert witness on behalf of Republican redistricting plans and a book that argues against competitive electoral districts. … The appointment would ‘undermine the credibility’ of the traditionally nonpartisan bureau, the president of the Leadership Conference on Civil and Human Rights said in a statement. Brunell ‘appears to lack the necessary management and statistical agency experience, and may be viewed by many to have a very political perspective,’ the president of the American Statistical Association wrote.”

LIFE IN TRUMP’S WASHINGTON:

— Ryan Zinke spent more than $14,000 on government helicopters to attend D.C. events this summer to accommodate a congressional swearing-in ceremony and a horseback ride with Mike Pence, according to travel logs. Politico’s Ben Lefebvre reports: “In a case detailed in the new documents, Zinke ordered a U.S. Park Police helicopter to take him and his [chief of staff] to an emergency management exercise in Shepherdstown, West Virginia, on June 21. Zinke’s staff justified the $8,000 flight by saying official business would prevent him leaving Washington before 2 p.m. … The event that prevented Zinke from leaving before 2 p.m. was the swearing-in ceremony for Rep. Greg Gianforte [R-Mont.] … Zinke also ordered a Park Police helicopter to fly him and another Interior official to and from Yorktown, Virginia, on July 7 in order to be back in Washington in time for a 4 p.m. horseback ride with Pence. The trip cost about $6,250, according to the documents.”

Josh Dawsey has an inside look at a $100,000-per-person Trump fundraiser in New York last weekend: “When Trump returned to his home city, he zipped up Park Avenue to huddle with a number of former business associates and friends at the triplex of Blackstone chief executive Stephen Schwarzman. About two dozen of them paid $100,000 each to hear Trump talk for about 20 minutes — or about $5,000 a minute. … Trump seemed, several people familiar with the event said, in his element. Many of the donors praised his performance in office, and he soaked in the adulation.”

The best anecdote from the event: “The president told the donors — which included gas magnate John Hess, billionaire Richard Lauder, sugar magnate Pepe Fanjul and casino executive Steve Wynn — all about his tax plan and how it would help the middle class. The crowd was filled with hedge fund managers and other titans that will see their taxes cut. It was ‘a little ironic,’ one person with direct knowledge of the event said.”

— But, but, but: Attendees attempted to convince Trump to make last-minute changes to the tax bill to benefit New York. Damian Paletta and Josh Dawsey report: “At the fundraiser, [real estate magnate Richard] LeFrak asked Trump about changes in the tax bill that could help wealthier New Yorkers, people familiar with the exchange said. At least one other donor jumped in to echo the concerns, the people said. In response, Trump told the group he was aware of the concerns among his old friends and business associates — and that he understood them. ‘The president was a little vague in his response on that,’ an attendee at the fundraiser said, saying Trump said, ‘Well, we’ve got to see what happens. Maybe there are ways to try to be helpful.’

— Democratic lawmakers were excluded from the White House Hanukkah reception, breaking with a tradition of bipartisanship. Julie Hirschfeld Davis and Katie Rogers report: “He also did not invite Reform Jewish leaders who have been critical of him or progressive Jewish activists who have differed with him publicly on policy issues. The move injected a partisan tinge into a normally bipartisan celebration at the White House, where on Thursday Mr. Trump spoke to a crowd standing amid Christmas trees.”

SOCIAL MEDIA SPEED READ:

Obama’s former chief strategist lamented Franken’s resignation:

From Vox’s editorial director:

From a Post reporter:

The editor in chief of FiveThirtyEight made this suggestion:

From an NPR reporter:

From Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.):

From former independent presidential candidate Evan McMullin:

Rep. Trent Franks’s resignation sparked shock, criticism and a few jokes. From a Post correspondent:

From the Nevada Independent’s editor:

From a Post opinions editor:

From a writer for Media Matters:

A HuffPost reporter parodied Franks’s statement on his resignation:

Hillary Clinton encouraged her supporters to channel their frustrations with politics into the CHIP fight:

A Time columnist shared this photo of the California wildfires:

A reporter for The Fix noticed these errors:

A Post reporter mocked the White House response to John Lewis’s decision not to attend the civil rights museum opening:

A writer for Tablet magazine pointed out this about the White House’s Hanukkah reception:

Here’s the Trump tweet in question:

The Pences mourned the loss of a family pet:

And Sen. Gary Peters (D-Mich.) shared this very 90s throwback from the recently demolished Silverdome:

GOOD READS FROM ELSEWHERE:

— Politico Magazine, “Kirsten Gillibrand’s Moment Has Arrived,” by David Freedlander: “The 51-year-old Gillibrand has come to represent a rising generation of Democratic leaders, one who came of age in an era when equality of the sexes was something almost taken for granted. And the buzz about her presidential ambitions has only grown. For years, the issues that Gillibrand has made her name on—aid for 9/11 workers, ending ‘don’t ask don’t tell’ in the military, transgender rights—were important but distinct, touching on segments of American life that most people never interact with. And now, at a moment when the cover has been ripped off toxic workplaces from Hollywood to Wall Street, Gillibrand is finding that the rest of the world has caught up with her crusades.”

— AP, “Trust no one: Scholar risked all to document Islamic State,” by Lori Hinnant and Maggie Michael: “The weight of months and years of anonymity were crushing him. … He wasn’t a spy. He was an undercover historian and blogger. [But as ISIS] turned the city he loved into a fundamentalist bastion, he decided he would show the world how the extremists had distorted its true nature, how they were trying to rewrite the past and forge a brutal Sunni-only future for a city that had once welcomed many faiths. … He called himself Mosul Eye [and] made a promise to himself in those first few days: Trust no one, document everything. And now, he was running for his life.”

— The New York Times, “James O’Keefe, Practitioner of the Sting, Has an Ally in Trump,” by Kenneth P. Vogel: “[T]hese should be good times for Mr. O’Keefe. He has an ally in the Oval Office who shares his views. The nonprofit group he started in 2010, Project Veritas, and an affiliated political arm called Project Veritas Action Fund have raised nearly $16 million, according to tax filings, and last year the group paid him $317,000. After years of criticism from across the political spectrum — including from a conservative establishment that has viewed him with suspicion — Mr. O’Keefe would seem well positioned to be more broadly embraced by the right, and feared by the left. Yet Mr. O’Keefe cannot seem to get out of his own way.”

— The New Yorker, “Why Russia Will See Its Olympic Ban as a Declaration of War,” by Masha Gessen: “Since resuming the duties of President for the third time … [Putin] has restored many of the habits and cultural institutions of Soviet society. The lived experience of a Russian citizen is that of the subject of a totalitarian society, one in which everything is political: genuinely private space shrinks into nonexistence. In this disposition, the choice that the I.O.C. has posed to the athletes is one between self and country. Kremlin shills have already started bandying about the word ‘treason.’ The word suggests that Russia is at war with the world, and that is exactly how it sees itself: a country under attack, surrounded by hostile forces. This pervading sense of life in a fortress under siege is what makes today’s Russia, for all its visible superficial differences, so fundamentally similar to the Soviet Union.”

— The New York Times, “The Adopted Black Baby, and the White One Who Replaced Her,” by John Eligon: “It was around 1970 in Deerfield, Ill., and Ms. Sandberg told her youngest child a closely guarded secret about a choice the family had made, one fueled by the racial tensions of the era, that sent a black girl and the white girl that took her place on diverging paths. Decades later, the journeys of the two women tell a nuanced story of race in America, one that complicates easy assumptions about white privilege and black hardship. Lives take unexpected twists and turns, this family story suggests, no matter the race of those involved. And years later, it is not easy to figure out the role of race when looking for lessons learned.”

HOT ON THE LEFT

“The odd episode of Sam Seder’s firing — and rehiring — by MSNBC,” from Paul Farhi: “First, MSNBC fired a left-wing commentator over an eight-year-old tweet the pundit said was a joke but which a far-right activist said showed insensitivity about rape. Then a small ruckus ensued: Over the firing. Over the tweet. Over MSNBC’s caving to the right-wing guy’s complaint about the tweet. On Thursday, the saga took another sharp turn: MSNBC reversed itself and hired back the lefty guy, Sam Seder, whom it had dismissed earlier in the week amid a pressure campaign from conservative conspiracy theorist and gadfly Mike Cernovich.”

 

HOT ON THE RIGHT

“Lindsey Vonn: I won’t be representing US President at Winter Olympics,” from CNN: “Targeting Olympic gold at February’s Winter Olympics in Pyeongchang, Vonn is in St. Moritz, Switzerland, where she spoke passionately about what it means to compete for the US ski team. ‘Well I hope to represent the people of the United States, not the president,’ Vonn told CNN’s Alpine Edge. … And Vonn revealed she wouldn’t accept an invitation to the White House if she were to win gold at Pyeongchang. ‘Absolutely not,’ said Vonn. ‘No. But I have to win to be invited. No actually I think every US team member is invited so no I won’t go.’”

 

DAYBOOK:

Trump has a lunch with Pence and a meeting with Jim Mattis. He will then leave for his rally in Pensacola, Fla., after which he’s flying to West Palm Beach.

QUOTE OF THE DAY: 

While recognizing the heroic actions veteran George Blake took during the attack on Pearl Harbor, Trump said, “Thank you, George. It was a pretty wild scene. You’ll never forget that, right?”

 

NEWS YOU CAN USE IF YOU LIVE IN D.C.:

— D.C. will see cloudy skies and temperatures in the 40s today. The Capital Weather Gang forecasts: “It’s more cloudy than not, with high temperatures staying muted and chilly. We may be stuck around 40 to as high as the mid-40s if we’re lucky. Other than a stray flake or two, we should remain dry[.]”

— The Wizards beat the Suns 109-99. (Candace Buckner)

— National GOP leadership is searching for another Republican to run against Sen. Tim Kaine (D-Va.) next year, dreading the idea of supporting a Corey Stewart bid. Jenna Portnoy and Laura Vozzella report: “Sen. Cory Gardner (Colo.), chairman of the National Republican Senatorial Committee, recently summoned former governor James S. Gilmore III to Washington to ask him to run, while Sens. Rand Paul (Ky.) and Mike Lee (Utah) met with Del. Nick Freitas (Culpeper) to advise him on a likely campaign. Stewart dismissed national Republicans working against him as ‘Mitch McConnell’s bozos.”

— Virginia Democrats filed an amended complaint in federal court to seek a new election for a House of Delegates race affected by voter assignment errors. Laura Vozzella reports: “Republican Robert Thomas beat Democrat Joshua Cole by 82 votes on Nov. 7 in [the] contest[.] … But the outcome, which could affect which party leads the chamber, is in dispute because of errors that led 147 voters to cast ballots in the wrong race.”

— Sen. Ted Cruz (R-Tex.) and Rep. Mark Meadows (R-N.C.) proposed legislation to allow virtually D.C. student to use public funds to cover private school tuition. Parents who opt out of public schools for their children would be given money directly to use on private schools or even home-schooling costs. Similar bills introduced last year didn’t receive hearing; the measure is unlikely to pass this year either. (Moriah Balingit)

— The New York restaurant Sushi Nakazawa, which is preparing to open a second location in Trump’s D.C. hotel, was accused of wage theft in a class-action lawsuit. (Maura Judkis)

VIDEOS OF THE DAY:

Seth Meyers tackled Al Franken’s resignation:

Stephen Colbert made fun of Donald Trump Jr. following his testimony on Capitol Hill:

Jeff Sessions argued with Justice Department interns during an event this summer, according to newly obtained footage:

A CNN reporter found this old video of Roy Moore:

Sen. Luther Strange (R-Ala.), who lost the GOP primary to Moore, delivered his farewell address in the Senate:

And this moment gave Californians hope amid the wildfires:

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The Stunning Hypocrisy of Sarah Sanders’s Media Smear

The Stunning Hypocrisy of Sarah Sanders’s Media Smear

In another Orwellian performance, White House Press Secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders fulminates about the press, aping her boss as she claims the media is “purposely putting out information that you know to be false.” The president inveighs against CNN, ABC, The Washington Post, etc., amid high-profile slip-ups, skirts the patently obvious about his frequent daily scrimmage with the truth.

Somebody might send them a copy of a Nov. 14 Post report by Glenn Kessler and colleagues who updated their running tally of false or misleading claims by Donald Trump, who by then the President-elect of a world superpower. It was 1,628.

That was then and this is now. They’ve not recalculated that towering figure since but Kessler tells me he guesses there have been at least another 100 errors. That may seem conservative but it does dovetail with a distinct irony as Trump and Sanders castigate the “Fake News” mainstream press: Trump never seems to correct his errors, unlike, well, the “Fake News” media routinely does.

It partly explains a droll effort by Jill Lawrence, commentary editor of USA Today, who imagines what it would be like if The White House Press Office, just like a quality news organization, actually systematically corrected errors. For example, you might get this:

Office of the Press Secretary

Statement by President Trump on his assertions about the tax bill he hopes to sign:

“I deeply regret and apologize for the serious factual error I made when I characterized my tax bill as the ‘biggest tax cut in U.S. history.’ In fact, credit for the largest tax cut would go to Ronald Reagan or George W. Bush. I was also wrong to say the bill is ‘not good for me.’ I would benefit from elimination of the alternative minimum tax and lower taxes on pass-through businesses, and my children would benefit from elimination or reduction of the estate tax.”

Or maybe this:

Office of the Press Secretary

Statement by President Trump on his record to date:

“I deeply regret and apologize for the serious error I made when I said in a ‘non-braggadocios way’ that ‘there has never been a 10-month president that has accomplished what we have accomplished.’ That was an oversight given the crises faced by some of my predecessors, from Lincoln, FDR and Truman to George W. Bush and Obama, not to mention George Washington’s challenge of creating a country from scratch. Let me add that my press secretary, Sarah Huckabee Sanders, was wrong to say it is ‘laughable’ that ‘Obama thinks he has anything to do with the success of where the economy is right now.’ I am suspending Sanders for four weeks. While I would not have led us out of the Great Recession the same way Obama did, it is inarguable that he and Bush saved the auto industry and that Obama left me a healthy economy to build on.”

There’s more but the motive for her reverie is clear. Says Lawrence, “There’s been frustration simmering on Twitter and elsewhere about Trump’s double standard on fake news — he can spread it without consequence, but when the legit news media make a mistake, it’s off with our heads. I wanted to make the point in a way that would be different from the hand wringing that seems to be our default mode these days. I started writing these fake apologies and found myself quite enjoying that alternate universe. For space reasons (even online, you can’t go on forever) I had to stop at four. Sad!”

As for The Post’s fact-checker nonpareil Kessler, alluding to the paper’s system of grading by Pinocchio’s: “President Trump has said he doesn’t like to get Pinocchios so I live in hope that he will admit an error of fact. We don’t give Pinocchios if a politician admits he or she made a mistake.”

Like, say, admitting that you shared an anti-Muslim video you couldn’t substantiate with 44 million Twitter followers.

Ryan Lizza let go by The New Yorker

Bill O’Reilly, Charlie Rose, Mark Halperin, Michael Oreskes, Glenn Thrush and Matt Lauer. Add the fine New Yorker political writer to the mix after he was outright fired for alleged inappropriate sexual conduct. In a trifecta of bad news for him, CNN suspended its relationship and Georgetown University bid him farewell.

What’s notable here is his outright denial. There’d been the almost requisite declaration of some contrition. For Lizza, no.

“I am dismayed that the New Yorker has decided to characterize a respectful relationship with a woman I was dating as somehow inappropriate. The New Yorker was unable to cite any company policy that was violated. I am sorry to my friends, workplace colleagues, and loved ones for any embarrassment this episode may cause.”

The publicly unidentified woman’s lawyer, who’s filed 11 lawsuits against Fox News,  took distinct issues with the notion of “respectful relationship.”

It was Lizza who received the profanity-filled, late-night call from now-you-see-him, then-you-didn’t White House Communications Director Anthony Scaramucci that promptly led to his exit.

And this in from NPR….

“Tirades directed at young women in the studio. Name calling and belittling critiques of show ideas during meetings. ‘Creepy’ sex talk, hugs and back or neck rubs after a dressing down. That’s the pattern of alleged abuse described by 11 mostly young women and men who filed a multi-page document outlining their complaints against On Point host Tom Ashbrook,” reports his home station, WBUR-FM in Boston.

“Details of the document emerged in an interview with one of the complainants and a second source who reviewed it. It was delivered to WBUR and the station’s owner, Boston University. Interviews with more than a dozen current and former On Point staffers confirmed the nature of the allegations.”

“On Point is carried by more than 290 NPR stations in the United States. Ashbrook has been the widely acclaimed host for 16 years.” He said he was stunned and “I have no idea what is being alleged, nor by whom.”

Well, this is all rather less important than an ongoing Boston Globe series on race in the city. The latest installment is about the health system and finds, “Though the issue gets scant attention in this center of world-class medicine, segregation patterns are deeply imbedded in Boston health care. Simply put: If you are black in Boston, you are less likely to get care at several of the city’s elite hospitals than if you are white.”

But wait….

“Hall of Fame running back Marshall Faulk was among three NFL Network analysts suspended Monday night in response to a new filing in a lawsuit brought by former wardrobe stylist,” writes USA Today. The others are Ike Taylor and Heath Evans.

And from The Financial Times

Susan Fowler, the software engineer “who lifted the lid on sexual harassment at Uber and inspired women to speak out,” is the Financial Times Person of the Year.

Comcast out of 21st Century Fox bidding

As the Los Angeles Times __notes, “Walt Disney Co.’s potential deal to acquire much of Rupert Murdoch’s entertainment empire appears to be in the home stretch as the only other serious bidder, Comcast Corp., confirmed that it was no longer in the running.”

Uncovering “Mosul Eye”

For more than three years, he documented atrocities by ISIS without letting the world know his true identity. Then he fled to Europe and finally decided to go public via two AP reporters: Paris-based Lori Hinnant and Cairo-based Maggie Michael. It’s a story of their persistence but also of some trick professional issues.

Notably, as heroic as Omar Mohammed was, how could one verify his claims? What about his clearly risking his life by smoking a cigaret in an ISIS controlled area on the Tigris?

“Omar gave us databases from his hard drive tracking the dead, noting daily events in Mosul. Each one was a separate file — totaling hundreds of files. The origin dates on each matched the date of the file, or at most was one or two days away from it. For his account of the day on the Tigris, he gave us multiple photos and a video from the day, each with an origin date in March 2015, which was when he said the events had happened. On Google Maps, he showed us the curve in the river where he picnicked, and zoomed on the marshy areas to show how it matched up with his account. As for himself blogging inside a dark room in his house in Mosul, he provided a video that AP used. He used maps to show his escape route. He showed on Google a list of the top students from his high school in Mosul, and his name was among the top five.”

There’s more in this email chat I had with the duo.

The Post hammers Fusion GPS

The Washington Post disclosed new details about the work of Fusion GPS, the investigative firm whose founders include ex-Wall Street Journal journalists Glenn Simpson and Peter Fritsch. The firm has largely come to light due to its involvement on the dubious Trump “dossier” but there’s much more here about its methods, secrecy and tactics that go beyond traditional opposition research for a wide array of clients.

One depressing parenthetical to its story is the dubious labor of famous attorney David Boies. The New York Times has already ditched his law firm for a “grave betrayal of trust” in both representing the firm and seeking to sidetrack a Times investigation of the disgusting actions of former longtime client Harvey Weinstein. And it’s also chronicled his involvement in seemingly slimy litigation representing a former boyfriend against novelist Emma Cline, author of The Girls.

But this details how Boies (and GPS) did the bidding of Theranos, the once hot, now-belittled health technology firm, in trying to stymie Wall Street Journal reporting on the company not linked to knowingly dubious blood tests. But great Journal works and many awards for the paper came despite his heavy-handed threats.

This is a great saga with one element still undisclosed: how rich has GPS gotten via its handiwork for what The Post  calls its “eclectic” clientele? It’s presumably a whole lot more than Simpson and Frisch would have made as print-and digital-stained wretches.

“The trademark Fox mouth”

In a New York Review of Books essay on Gretchen Carlson’s book, Northwestern University academic Laura Kipnis writes, “The ‘idealized pedestal’ Miss America gets put on is itself a form of disempowerment, Carlson eventually came to realize. True, and if you flip to your local Fox affiliate, you’ll see the same compliant femininity distilled to its purest iteration. Like beauty contestants, the women of Fox are hired on the basis of looks, then laminated into near mannequins. The visual requirements may be ramping down at other news networks, but the optics at Fox make clear what’s expected from women: to begin with, not to be men.”

“The idea of rigidly binary gender roles is under assault in certain quarters, but it’s hard at work here, indeed visually exaggerated as much as possible. Even when the persona is feisty, the dress code says feminine submission: tourniquet-tight dresses (undergirded by tethers of the appropriately named ‘Spanx’), plunging necklines, four-inch stilettos to prevent anyone from bolting. Hemlines are so dangerously short that recrossing one’s legs—given Ailes’s notorious ‘leg-cam’—leads to embarrassing crotch shots being posted online; in the ones of Carlson she appears to be auditioning for Sharon Stone’s role in Basic Instinct. (Men in the newsroom are allowed not to have bodies; women are all body.)”

“Then there’s the trademark Fox mouth: lips glossed to perpetual blow-job readiness. One illuminating tidbit from (Gabriel) Sherman’s reporting is provided by a former Fox makeup artist who tells of female anchors dropping by to get their makeup done before private meetings with Ailes. ‘I’m going to see Roger, gotta look beautiful!’ they’d say; at least one of them resurfaced post-meeting with the makeup on nose and chin gone.

“I’m not saying that women get harassed because of the way they dress. The point is that the way Ailes expected ‘his’ women to dress makes clear the role they were expected to play: receptacles. Whether that means blowing the boss or swallowing male fantasies generally, that’s the visual.”

The morning Babel (“one of our attorneys is Jewish” edition)

It was mostly the Roy Moore election today in Alabama, with Morning Joe co-host Joe Scarborough wondering if there’d be a Trump impact that’s less related to Trump’s endorsement than this Trump-like reality: prospective voters not being straight to pollsters about their plan to vote for Moore.

Trump & Friends was all about terrorism, immigration and hero Port Authority police as it heralded the arrest of the attempted suicide bomber in New York City yesterday. It bought in a pundit who’s a bit fan of enhanced interrogation and said the guy should be treated like “an unlawful enemy combatant.” It then turned to Alabama with the requisite countdown clock (until polls close), as did CNN)

CNN pundit John Avlon spoke of the political tone-deafness, and discomfort with diversity, articulated by Moore’s wife as she declared, “We had very close friends that are Jewish, and rabbis, and are in fellowship with them.” As Alisyn Camerota noted, the writers at Saturday Night Live probably had just sent them a bouquet of flowers for the prospective sketch inspiration.

Net neutrality and local news

“A report published Monday, ahead of the FCC’s Thursday vote to repeal net neutrality, highlights the damage that repeal could have on local news,” reports Poynter’s Kristen Hare. “The report, Slowing Down The Presses: The Relationship Between Net Neutrality and Local News, comes out of Stanford Law School’s Center for Internet and Society.”

The repeal, which could create tolls for internet companies and tiers of access for consumers, is also expected to damage local news, which is both suffering at the legacy level and just emerging for new online publications, according to the report. And Adam Hersh, who authored the study, explains the impact on local news:

“The general principle of net neutrality is that internet service providers should be prevented from interfering with applications that travel across their networks. But the net neutrality debate, and the FCC’s Open Internet Order, tends to subdivide that general principle into a set of bright-line rules addressing four main areas: (1) charging access fees to application providers or the networks they use to deliver content to broadband ISPs simply to load properly or at all for the ISP’s subscribers; (2) blocking traffic from certain applications altogether; (3) discriminating in the treatment given to traffic from different applications (often called “throttling”); and (4) charging fast lane fees to application providers in return for preferential treatment (often called “paid prioritization”). Each of these practices would have effects on local news.”

Our intelligence failures with Russia

Susan Glasser does a strong podcast, The Global Politico, and her latest, with two-time Acting CIA Chief Michael Morell delves into an array of seeming intelligence failures, as well as the notion that intelligence officials unhappy with trump probably were a bit too garrulous and open in their dismay. One snippet:

Glasser: So, do you think that in making choices, we underestimated Russia and its return under Vladimir Putin?

Morell: I think yes. Right? I think in the early Putin days as president, and then certainly when Medvedev was president and Putin was prime minister, Russia was not what it is today. We were interacting with them in a much more normal way—we being the United States and Europe. It was only when Putin came back the second time as president, that the behavior started to turn, and turned significantly back towards what was essentially Russian behavior during the Cold War, which is challenge the United States everywhere you can in the world, and do whatever you can to undermine what they’re trying to accomplish. Do whatever you can to weaken them.

They’re being extraordinarily aggressive with regard to that. And that was a change. That wasn’t Vladimir Putin from day one.

Speaking of Putin

It’s not an entirely new thesis but Julia Ioffe does a good job in The Atlantic on the misnomer of Putin as a genius and the penchant to attribute everything Russia-related to him. It’s a needed reminder for reporters about the perils of caricature.

The Daily Beast and Russia

The politics and culture site backed by Barry Diller and first run by Tina Brown has down very solid work on Russian influence on American politics. Here, editors and reporters Noah Shachtman, Betsy Woodruff and Spencer Ackerman discuss with me how they’ve gone about finding targets of opportunity on a story that armies are covering. The best saga involves this, as Shachtman explained:

” We found that associated with two of the stranger Russian propaganda accounts that purported to be either against police violence or in favor of Black Lives Matter-style movements, those efforts were hosted by a company owned by a Russian-Ukrainian guy on Staten Island.”

Lost in the shuffle in Brooklyn

For five weeks prosecutors have been unveiling their case in the racketeering trial of former top South American soccer officials. Coverage is modest but Bloomberg notes how “The South American soccer barons gathered at Miami Beach’s St. Regis Bal Harbour hotel in late April 2014 to gloat: they’d just made $100 million selling the rights to the Copa America soccer tournament.”  (Ah, time flies, on that same site, years ago, I used to cover the lords of labor, including some ethically challenged union bosses, holding a then-annual winter gathering).

“’Business is going very well!’ Argentinian sports-marketing executive Mariano Jinkis elatedly told his partners, citing sales to Mexico’s Univision and Fox Sports. ‘We will have $100 million of profit,’ he crowed, ‘from the U.S. only!'”

“What Jinkis didn’t know was the FBI was also listening — through surreptitious recordings made by an associate. That’s how the U.S. mounted a sprawling corruption probe of FIFA, the organizing body for the world’s most popular sport, eventually ensnaring more than 40 people, including soccer officials and sports-marketing businessmen.”

So far it’s a saga of millions of dollars in alleged gifts and bribes, and secret ledgers. For example, one IRS agent  showed how one defendant and his wife “opened an account at Morgan Stanley under an entity called Firelli International Ltd., where $4.9 million was deposited from an Andorran bank between January and March 2014.”

Corrections? Tips? Please email me: jwarren@poynter.org. Would you like to get this roundup emailed to you every morning? Sign up here.

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Ivanka Trump’s best style moments in 2017

Ivanka Trump’s best style moments in 2017

Ivanka Trump’s best style moments in 2017

All eyes were on Ivanka Trump in 2017 — and she definitely delivered in the fashion department. We don’t know if Ivanka and FLOTUS Melania Trump exchange style secrets behind closed doors, but it’s safe to say that Ivanka, like the first lady, had quite a stylish year.

71 PHOTOS

Ivanka Trump’s best style moments in 2017

See Gallery

Ivanka Trump’s best style moments in 2017

NEW YORK – JANUARY 19: Ivanka Trump and Jared Kushner are seen out in Manhattan on January 19, 2017 in New York, New York. (Photo by Josiah Kamau/BuzzFoto via Getty Images)

NEW YORK – JANUARY 19: Ivanka Trump and Jared Kushner are seen out in Manhattan on January 19, 2017 in New York, New York. (Photo by Josiah Kamau/BuzzFoto via Getty Images)

WASHINGTON, DC – JANUARY 20: (L-R) Ivanka Trump and Donald Trump, Jr. arrive on the West Front of the U.S. Capitol on January 20, 2017 in Washington, DC. In today’s inauguration ceremony Donald J. Trump becomes the 45th president of the United States. (Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images)

WASHINGTON, DC – JANUARY 20: Jared Kushner, holding son Theodore Kushner, walks with wife Ivanka Trump and daughter Arabella Kushner behind U.S. President Donald J. Trump and first lady Melania Trump down Pennsylvania Avenue in front of the White House during the Inaugural Parade January 20, 2017 in Washington, DC. Donald J. Trump was sworn in today as the 45th president of the United States. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

WASHINGTON, DC – JANUARY 20: Ivanka Trump (L) dances with her husband and White House senior advisor Jared Kushner during the Freedom Ball at the Washington Convention Center January 20, 2017 in Washington, DC. The ball is part of the celebrations following her father U.S. President Donald Trump’s inauguration. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

Ivanka Trump, her husband Jared Kuschner (L) and brother Eric Trump (R) arrive on stage at the Freedom Inaugural Ball, January 20, 2017, in Washington, DC. / AFP / Robyn Beck (Photo credit should read ROBYN BECK/AFP/Getty Images)

Ivanka Trump, the daughter of US President Donald Trump, arrives for the National Prayer Service at the National Cathedral on January 21, 2017 in Washington, DC. / AFP / MANDEL NGAN (Photo credit should read MANDEL NGAN/AFP/Getty Images)

Ivanka Trump, daughter of U.S. President Donald Trump, center, and her family arrive for the National Prayer Service at the National Cathedral in Washington, D.C., on Saturday, Jan. 21, 2017. Trump began his first full day in office Saturday at a prayer service in Washington where pastors of many faiths urged him to embrace peace and compassion, as tens of thousands of women gathered across town on the National Mall to protest his presidency. Photographer: Olivier Douliery/Pool via Bloomberg

WASHINGTON, DC – FEBRUARY 01: U.S. President Donald Trump and his daughter Ivanka Trump walk toward Marine One while departing from the White House, on February 1, 2017 in Washington, DC. Trump is making an unnanounced trip to Dover Air Force bace in Delaware to pay his respects to Chief Special Warfare Operator William ‘Ryan’ Owens, who was killed during a raid in Yemen. Owens is the first active military service member to die in combat during Trump’s presidency. (Photo by mark Wilson/Getty Images)

WASHINGTON, DC – FEBRUARY 01: U.S. President Donald Trump and his daughter Ivanka Trump walk toward Marine One while departing from the White House, on February 1, 2017 in Washington, DC. Trump is making an unnanounced trip to Dover Air Force bace in Delaware to pay his respects to Chief Special Warfare Operator William ‘Ryan’ Owens, who was killed during a raid in Yemen. Owens is the first active military service member to die in combat during Trump’s presidency. (Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images)

Jared Kushner (L), White House senior adviser, and his wife Ivanka Trump arrive for a joint press conference by US President Donald Trump and Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe on February 10, 2017, at the White House in Washington, DC. / AFP / MANDEL NGAN (Photo credit should read MANDEL NGAN/AFP/Getty Images)

Ivanka Trump and her husband White House senior advisor Jared Kushner arrive for a joint press conference between US President Donald Trump and Japan’s Prime Minister Shinzo Abe in the East Room of the White House in Washington, DC on February 10, 2017. / AFP / Brendan Smialowski (Photo credit should read BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP/Getty Images)

Ivanka Trump and husband Jared Kushner applaud as US President Donald Trump speaks during a joint session of Congress at the US Capitol in Washington, DC on February 28, 2017. / AFP / MANDEL NGAN (Photo credit should read MANDEL NGAN/AFP/Getty Images)

Ivanka Trump and husband Jared Kushner arrive prior to US President Donald Trump’s address before joint session of Congress at the US Capitol in Washington, DC on February 28, 2017. / AFP / ANDREW CABALLERO-REYNOLDS (Photo credit should read ANDREW CABALLERO-REYNOLDS/AFP/Getty Images)

WASHINGTON, DC – APRIL 05: Ivanka Trump and her husband, White House Senior Advisor Jared Kushner attend a news conference with her father U.S. President Donald Trump and King Abdullah II of Jordan in the Rose Garden of the White House April 5, 2017 in Washington, DC. President Trump held talks on Middle East peace process and other bilateral issues with King Abdullah II. (Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images)

WASHINGTON, DC – APRIL 05: Ivanka Trump walks with her husband, White House Senior Advisor Jared Kushner, prior to U.S. President Donald Trump and King Abdullah II of Jordan participate in a joint news conference at the Rose Garden of the White House April 5, 2017 in Washington, DC. President Trump held talks on Middle East peace process and other bilateral issues with King Abdullah II. (Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images)

BERLIN, GERMANY – APRIL 25: President Association of German Women Entrepreneurs Stephanie Bschorr, Ivanka Trump, daughter of U.S. President Donald Trump, German Chancellor Angela Merkel and Queen Maxima of The Netherlands attend the W20 conference on April 25, 2017 in Berlin, Germany. The conference, part of a series of events in connection with Germany’s leadership of the G20 group of nations this year, focuses on women’s empowerment, especially through entrepreneurship and the digital economy. (Photo by Sean Gallup/Getty Images)

BERLIN, GERMANY – APRIL 25: Ivanka Trump, daughter of U.S. President Donald Trump and Queen Maxima of The Netherlands attend the W20 conference on April 25, 2017 in Berlin, Germany. The conference, part of a series of events in connection with Germany’s leadership of the G20 group of nations this year, focuses on women’s empowerment, especially through entrepreneurship and the digital economy. (Photo by Patrick van Katwijk/Getty Images)

First Daughter and Advisor to the US President Ivanka Trump (R) and director of the Foundation Memorial to the Murdered Jews of Europe Uwe Neumaerker visits the Holocaust memorial on April 25, 2017 in Berlin. / AFP PHOTO / Odd ANDERSEN (Photo credit should read ODD ANDERSEN/AFP/Getty Images)

First Daughter and Advisor to the US President Ivanka Trump visits the Holocaust memorial during her visit on April 25, 2017 in Berlin. / AFP PHOTO / Odd ANDERSEN (Photo credit should read ODD ANDERSEN/AFP/Getty Images)

BERLIN, GERMANY – APRIL 25: Ivanka Trump, daughter of U.S. President Donald Trump and Kent Logsdon (R), Charg�dAffaires ad interim of US embassy in Berlin arrive at a Gala Dinner at Deutsche Bank within the framework of the W20 summit on April 25, 2017 in Berlin, Germany. Ivanka Trump attended the W20 conference on empowerment for women and is visiting the Siemens training center and the Holocaust Memorial before attending an evening gala sponsored by Deutsche Bank. (Photo by Clemens Bilan – Pool /Getty Images)

BERLIN, GERMANY – APRIL 25: Ivanka Trump, daughter of U.S. President Donald Trump, arrives at a Gala Dinner at Deutsche Bank within the framework of the W20 summit on April 25, 2017 in Berlin, Germany. Ivanka Trump attended the W20 conference on empowerment for women and is visiting the Siemens training center and the Holocaust Memorial before attending an evening gala sponsored by Deutsche Bank. (Photo by Clemens Bilan – Pool /Getty Images)

Ivanka Trump enters the Rose Garden of the White House following the House of Representative vote on the health care bill on May 4, 2017 in Washington, DC.
Following weeks of in-party feuding and mounting pressure from the White House, lawmakers voted 217 to 213 to pass a bill dismantling much of Barack Obama’s Affordable Care Act and allowing US states to opt out of many of the law’s key health benefit guarantees / AFP PHOTO / Mandel Ngan (Photo credit should read MANDEL NGAN/AFP/Getty Images)

Jared Kushner and Ivanka Trump make their way across the South Lawn to board Marine One at the White House in Washington, DC on May 4, 2017. The two are travelling with US President Donald Trump to New York, NY. / AFP PHOTO / Mandel NGAN (Photo credit should read MANDEL NGAN/AFP/Getty Images)

WASHINGTON, DC – MAY 09: Ivanka Trump, assistant to the president and daughter of President Donald Trump, delivers remarks during an event celebrating National Military Appreciation Month and National Military Spouse Appreciation Day in the Eisenhower Executive Office Building May 9, 2017 in Washington, DC. The vice president hosted about 160 spouses and children of the active duty U.S. military members. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

Ivanka Trump speaks during an event to celebrate National Military Appreciation Month and National Military Spouse Appreciation Day in the Eisenhower Executive Office Building on May 9, 2017 in Washington, DC. / AFP PHOTO / Mandel Ngan (Photo credit should read MANDEL NGAN/AFP/Getty Images)

WASHINGTON, DC – MAY 19: Ivanka Trump, daughter and assistant to U.S. President Donald Trump, walks with her husband, White House senior adviser Jared Kushner, on the South Lawn prior to their departure from the White House May 19, 2017 in Washington, DC. President Trump is traveling for his first foreign trip to visit Saudi Arabia, Israel, Vatican, and attending a NATO summit in Brussels, Belgium and a G7 summit in Taormina, Italy. (Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)

Ivanka Trump (C-L) and Jared Kushner (C-R) arrive to attend the presentation of the Order of Abdulaziz al-Saud medal at the Saudi Royal Court in Riyadh on May 20, 2017.
/ AFP PHOTO / MANDEL NGAN (Photo credit should read MANDEL NGAN/AFP/Getty Images)

Jared Kushner, senior White House adviser, right, and Ivanka Trump, assistant to U.S. President Donald Trump, board Marine One on the South Lawn of the White House in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Friday, May 19, 2017. Trump�departed Friday for his first foreign trip as president with his White House engulfed in crisis and little prospect for a break from the drama disrupting his agenda. Photographer: T.J. Kirkpatrick/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Ivanka Trump is seen at a ceremony where her father US President Donald Trump received the Order of Abdulaziz al-Saud medal from Saudi Arabia’s King Salman bin Abdulaziz al-Saud at the Saudi Royal Court in Riyadh on May 20, 2017. / AFP PHOTO / MANDEL NGAN (Photo credit should read MANDEL NGAN/AFP/Getty Images)

Ivanka Trump, the daughter of US President Donald Trump, is seen during a visit to the Western Wall, the holiest site where Jews can pray, in Jerusalems Old City on May 22, 2017. / AFP PHOTO / POOL / Heidi Levine (Photo credit should read HEIDI LEVINE/AFP/Getty Images)

Ivanka Trump (R), the daughter of US President Donald Trump and first lady Melania Trump (2nd R) walk at the Western Wall plaza in Jerusalems Old City on May 22, 2017. / AFP PHOTO / POOL / Heidi Levine (Photo credit should read HEIDI LEVINE/AFP/Getty Images)

White House senior advisor Jared Kushner (R) and Ivanka Trump, the daughter of the US president, stand on the runway at Ben Gurion Airport in Tel Aviv, on May 23, 2017, prior to boarding Air Force One for Rome. / AFP PHOTO / Jack GUEZ (Photo credit should read JACK GUEZ/AFP/Getty Images)

(From L-R) White House senior advisor Jared Kushner, daughter of US president Ivanka Trump, cantor Shay Abramson and Rabbi Yisrael Meir Lau attend a wreath laying ceremony during a visit to the Yad Vashem Holocaust Memorial museum, commemorating the six million Jews killed by the Nazis during World War II, on May 23, 2017, in Jerusalem. / AFP PHOTO / GALI TIBBON (Photo credit should read GALI TIBBON/AFP/Getty Images)

The daughter of US President Donald Trump, Ivanka Trump, waves at the end of her visit to the Vatican-affiliated NGO, the Community of Sant’Egidio, where she met victims of human trafficking, on May 24, 2017 in Rome. / AFP PHOTO / Filippo MONTEFORTE (Photo credit should read FILIPPO MONTEFORTE/AFP/Getty Images)

The daughter of US President Donald Trump, Ivanka Trump, addresses journalists at the end of her visit to the Vatican-affiliated NGO, the Community of Sant’Egidio, where she met victims of human trafficking, on May 24, 2017 in Rome. / AFP PHOTO / Filippo MONTEFORTE (Photo credit should read FILIPPO MONTEFORTE/AFP/Getty Images)

US President Donald Trump walks with his daughter Ivanka as they depart the White House in Washington, DC, June 13, 2017 en route to Wisconsin. / AFP PHOTO / JIM WATSON (Photo credit should read JIM WATSON/AFP/Getty Images)

WASHINGTON, DC – JUNE 13: U.S. President Donald Trump and daughter Ivanka Trump walk toward Marine One before departing from the White House on June 13, 2017 in Washington, DC. President Trump is traveling to Milwaukee, Wisconsin. Trump will visit Waukesha County Technical College and also appear at a political fundraiser.
(Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images)

Ivanka Trump (2nd R), daughter and adviser of US President Donald Trump, listens to her father speak during the launch of the Apprenticeship and Workforce of Tomorrow initiatives in the Roosevelt Room at the White House in Washington, DC, on June 15, 2017.
From L to R, Oklahoma Governor Mary Fallin, Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross, Trump and Small Business Administration administrator Linda McMahon. / AFP PHOTO / NICHOLAS KAMM (Photo credit should read NICHOLAS KAMM/AFP/Getty Images)

Ivanka Trump, assistant to U.S. President Donald Trump, center, attends an Apprenticeship and Workforce of Tomorrow initiatives event in the Roosevelt Room of the White House in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Thursday, June 15, 2017. Trump is giving businesses expanded authority to design their own apprenticeship programs in an executive order the White House announced this morning. Photographer: Olivier Douliery/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Ivanka Trump, daughter of US President Donald Trump, speaks with White House spokesman Sean Spicer after her father delivered a statement in the Diplomatic Room at the White House in Washington, DC, on June 14, 2017 after House Majority Whip Steve Scalise was shot in nearby Alexandria, Virginia.
The man who opened fire on Republican lawmakers at a baseball practice early Wednesday, wounding a top congressman and three others, has died of injuries sustained in a shootout with police, President Donald Trump said. ‘Many lives would have been lost, if not for the heroic actions of the two Capitol police officers who took down the gunman despite sustaining gunshot wounds during a very, very brutal assault,’ Trump said in remarks to the nation.

/ AFP PHOTO / NICHOLAS KAMM (Photo credit should read NICHOLAS KAMM/AFP/Getty Images)

Ivanka Trump, daughter and of US President Donald Trump, looks on before her father delivered a statement in the Diplomatic Room at the White House in Washington, DC, on June 14, 2017 after House Majority Whip Steve Scalise was shot in nearby Alexandria, Virginia.
The man who opened fire on Republican lawmakers at a baseball practice early Wednesday, wounding a top congressman and three others, has died of injuries sustained in a shootout with police, President Donald Trump said. ‘Many lives would have been lost, if not for the heroic actions of the two Capitol police officers who took down the gunman despite sustaining gunshot wounds during a very, very brutal assault,’ Trump said in remarks to the nation.

/ AFP PHOTO / NICHOLAS KAMM (Photo credit should read NICHOLAS KAMM/AFP/Getty Images)

WASHINGTON, DC – JUNE 22: Ivanka Trump, daughter to President Donald Trump, swings her daughter Arabella Rose Kushner in the Rose Garden during the Congressional Picnic on the South Lawn of the White House in Washington, DC on Thursday, June 22, 2017. (Photo by Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post via Getty Images)

WASHINGTON, DC – JUNE 22: White House senior adviser Jared Kushner holds their son Theodore James Kushner as Ivanka Trump kisses him during the Congressional Picnic on the South Lawn of the White House in Washington, DC on Thursday, June 22, 2017. (Photo by Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post via Getty Images)

The daughter of US President Donald Trump Ivanka Trump (R) and her husband White House senior advisor Jared Kushner make their wave from Air Force One to Marina One upon arrival at the airport in Hamburg, northern Germany on July 6, 2017.
Leaders of the world’s top economies will gather from July 7 to 8, 2017 in Germany for likely the stormiest G20 summit in years, with disagreements ranging from wars to climate change and global trade. / AFP PHOTO / dpa / Bernd Von Jutrczenka / Germany OUT (Photo credit should read BERND VON JUTRCZENKA/AFP/Getty Images)

The daughter of US President Donald Trump Ivanka Trump (R) and her husband White House senior advisor Jared Kushner make their wave from Air Force One to Marina One upon arrival at the airport in Hamburg, northern Germany on July 6, 2017.
Leaders of the world’s top economies will gather from July 7 to 8, 2017 in Germany for likely the stormiest G20 summit in years, with disagreements ranging from wars to climate change and global trade. / AFP PHOTO / dpa / Bernd Von Jutrczenka / Germany OUT (Photo credit should read BERND VON JUTRCZENKA/AFP/Getty Images)

WASHINGTON, DC – JUNE 27: Ivanka Trump delivers remarks at the U.S. State Department during the 2017 Trafficking in Persons Report ceremony June 27, 2017 in Washington, DC. The ceremony honored eight men and women from around the world whose efforts have made a lasting impact on the fight against modern slavery. (Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images)

WASHINGTON, DC – JUNE 27: Ivanka Trump delivers remarks at the U.S. State Department during the 2017 Trafficking in Persons Report ceremony June 27, 2017 in Washington, DC. The ceremony honored eight men and women from around the world whose efforts have made a lasting impact on the fight against modern slavery. (Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images)

the daughter of US President Donald Trump Ivanka Trump takes her seat at the beginning of the third working session of the G20 meeting in Hamburg, northern Germany, on July 8, 2017.
?The G20 summit wraps up, with world leaders seeking to reach an agreement on a final joint statement despite divisions with US President Donald Trump over trade and climate change. / AFP PHOTO / AFP PHOTO AND POOL / LUDOVIC MARIN / SOLELY FOR REUTERS AND EPA (Photo credit should read LUDOVIC MARIN/AFP/Getty Images)

HAMBURG, GERMANY – JULY 08: Daughter and advisor to US President Trump, Ivanka Trump attends a panel discussion titled ‘Launch Event Women’s Entrepreneur Finance Initiative’ on the second day of the G20 summit on July 8, 2017 in Hamburg, Germany. Leaders of the G20 group of nations are meeting for the July 7-8 summit. Topics high on the agenda for the summit include climate policy and development programs for African economies. (Photo by Ukas Michael – Pool/Getty Images)

Ivanka Trump speaks during an event with small businesses at the White House in Washington, DC, on August 1, 2017. / AFP PHOTO / JIM WATSON (Photo credit should read JIM WATSON/AFP/Getty Images)

Ivanka Trump (R) and SBA Administrator Linda McMahon arrive to speak during an event with small businesses at the White House in Washington, DC, on August 1, 2017. / AFP PHOTO / JIM WATSON (Photo credit should read JIM WATSON/AFP/Getty Images)

Ivanka Trump, daughter of US President Donald Trump, along with her children, Arabella (L) and Theodore, walk to board Air Force One prior to departure Morristown Municipal Airport in Morristown, New Jersey, August 20, 2017, as Trump returns to Washington, DC, following a 17-day vacation at his property in Bedminster, New Jersey. / AFP PHOTO / SAUL LOEB (Photo credit should read SAUL LOEB/AFP/Getty Images)

Ivanka Trump, daughter of US President Donald Trump, along with her children, Arabella (L) and Theodore, board Air Force One prior to departure Morristown Municipal Airport in Morristown, New Jersey, August 20, 2017, as Trump returns to Washington, DC, following a 17-day vacation at his property in Bedminster, New Jersey. / AFP PHOTO / SAUL LOEB (Photo credit should read SAUL LOEB/AFP/Getty Images)

WASHINGTON, DC – AUGUST 30: Ivanka Trump, advisor and daughter of U.S. President Donald Trump, steps off Marine One on the South Lawn after returning to the White House August 30, 2017 in Washington, DC. Trump traveled with her father to Springfield, Missouri, to participate in a tax reform kickoff event, according to the White House. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

Ivanka Trump (L) and US Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin participate in a tax reform kickoff event at the Loren Cook Company in Springfield, MO, on August 30, 2017. / AFP PHOTO / JIM WATSON (Photo credit should read JIM WATSON/AFP/Getty Images)

NEW YORK, NY – SEPTEMBER 19: Ivanka Trump on September 19, 2017 in New York City. (Photo by Gotham/GC Images)

NEW YORK, NY – SEPTEMBER 19: Ivanka Trump on September 19, 2017 in New York City. (Photo by Gotham/GC Images)

WASHINGTON, DC – OCTOBER 09: Advisor to the president Ivanka Trump speaks onstage at the Fortune Most Powerful Women Summit on October 9, 2017 in Washington, DC. (Photo by Paul Morigi/Getty Images for Fortune)

WASHINGTON, DC – OCTOBER 09: Advisor to the president Ivanka Trump speaks onstage at the Fortune Most Powerful Women Summit on October 9, 2017 in Washington, DC. (Photo by Paul Morigi/Getty Images for Fortune)

Ivanka Trump, the daughter and assistant to US President Donald Trump, right, and Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe, left, stand together at the World Assembly for Women (WAW!) in Tokyo on November 3, 2017.
Ivanka Trump spoke at the World Assembly for Women in the Japanese capital ahead of her father’s presidential visit. / AFP PHOTO / POOL / Eugene Hoshiko (Photo credit should read EUGENE HOSHIKO/AFP/Getty Images)

Ivanka Trump (L), advisor to US President Donald Trump, and Japan’s Prime Minister Shinzo Abe attend a meeting of the World Assembly for Women (WAW!) in Tokyo on November 3, 2017.
Ivanka Trump is to speak at the World Assembly for Women in the Japanese capital ahead of her father’s presidential visit. / AFP PHOTO / POOL / KIM KYUNG-HOON (Photo credit should read KIM KYUNG-HOON/AFP/Getty Images)

TOKYO, JAPAN – NOVEMBER 03 : Ivanka Trump (R), Advisor to US President Donald Trump, is welcomed by Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe for a dinner at a restaurant in Tokyo, Japan, 03 November 2017. Trump will start his asian tour from Japan 05 November 2017. (Photo by Kimimasa Mayama / POOL/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)

Ivanka Trump (R) holds her daughter Arabella Kushner’s hand as she walk with sister Tiffany Trump (L) after viewing the pardoned Thanksgiving turkey Drumstick in the Rose Garden of the White House in Washington, DC, on November 21, 2017. / AFP PHOTO / JIM WATSON (Photo credit should read JIM WATSON/AFP/Getty Images)

TOKYO, JAPAN – NOVEMBER 03 : Ivanka Trump (R), Advisor to US President Donald Trump, is welcomed by Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe for a dinner at a restaurant in Tokyo, Japan, 03 November 2017. Trump will start his asian tour from Japan 05 November 2017. (Photo by Kimimasa Mayama / POOL/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)

WASHINGTON, DC – NOVEMBER 21: U.S. President Donald Trump’s daughters Tiffany Trump (L) and Ivanka Trump and her daughter Arabella Kushner leave the Rose Garden after the pardoning ceremony for the National Thanksgiving Turkey at the White House November 21, 2017 in Washington, DC. Following the presidential pardon, ‘Drumstick,’ the 40-pound White Holland breed raised by National Turkey Federation Chairman Carl Wittenburg in Minnesota, will reside at his new home, ‘Gobbler’s Rest,’ at Virginia Tech. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

Advisor to the US President Ivanka Trump leaves after speaking during the Global Entrepreneurship Summmit at the Hyderabad convention centre (HICC) in Hyderabad on November 28, 2017.
Ivanka Trump urged India on November 28 to close its yawning gender gap in the job market, telling a business summit in her biggest foreign mission yet that this would bring huge economic benefits. / AFP PHOTO / MONEY SHARMA (Photo credit should read MONEY SHARMA/AFP/Getty Images)

Advisor to the US President Ivanka Trump speaks during the Global Entrepreneurship Summmit at the Hyderabad convention centre (HICC) in Hyderabad on November 28, 2017.
The Global Entrepreneurship Summmit will take place from 28th to 30th of November. / AFP PHOTO / MONEY SHARMA (Photo credit should read MONEY SHARMA/AFP/Getty Images)

Advisor to the US President Ivanka Trump looks on during a panel discussion at the Global Entrepreneurship Summit at the Hyderabad convention centre (HICC) in Hyderabad on November 29, 2017.
Ivanka urged India on November 28 to close its yawning gender gap in the job market, telling a business summit in her biggest foreign mission yet that this would bring huge economic benefits. US President Donald Trump’s eldest daughter urged India to seize the untapped potential in women in a speech before Prime Minister Narendra Modi and business leaders in Hyderabad.
/ AFP PHOTO / MONEY SHARMA (Photo credit should read MONEY SHARMA/AFP/Getty Images)

HYDERABAD, INDIA – NOVEMBER 29: Advisor to the U.S. President and head of the United States delegation Ivanka Trump speaks during a quiz with emerging enterpreneurs on the second day of the 8th annual Global Entrepreneurship Summit (GES) in Hyderabad, India on November 29, 2017. The summit will highlight the theme Women First, Prosperity for All, and will focus on supporting women entrepreneurs and fostering economic growth globally. The annual GES entrepreneurship gathering that convenes emerging entrepreneurs, investors and supporters from around the world, runs from 28 to 30 November. (Photo by Stringer/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)




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The first daughter started off the year with a sartorial bang at the Inaugural Ball, wearing a champagne-colored dress with bedazzled, sheer sleeves by American designer Carolina Herrera. She wore her long blonde tresses in a low chignon bun, showing off every sparkly detail of the stunning look.

More often times than not, Ivanka is seen in tailored workwear looks as she leaves her Washington D.C. home every morning. The White House adviser has stepped out in an array of looks from brands like Zara, Gucci and her namesake label. A $35 Victoria Beckham dress from Target she wore in June immediately sold out online. 

Our favorite looks from this year? This Japanese-inspired Johanna Ortiz frock she wore in November and this J. Mendel gown for the Governor’s Ball back in February remain some of her most gorgeous looks in 2017. And how could we forget about the Reformation sundress she wore for the Congressional Picnic? While the look garnered criticism for its off-the-shoulder style, she looked like an absolute vision in the white and rose pink floral frock. 

Check out the slideshow above for Ivanka Trump’s best style moments in 2017!

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