Trump teases his ‘very interesting’ meeting with Kim Jong Un: Live updates

Trump teases his ‘very interesting’ meeting with Kim Jong Un: Live updates

Check back here for live updates on the historic U.S.-North Korea summit in Singapore:

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7: 15 p.m. EDT /7: 15 a.m. Singapore

It’s Monday morning now in Singapore – where it’s 24 hours ahead of Washington/East Coast time. And in a little more than 24 hours, President Donald Trump is slated to sit down with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un for a high-stakes meeting between leaders of two nations with a history of tension and threats over Pyongyang’s nuclear weapons program.

That meeting is scheduled for 9 a.m. Tuesday in Singapore, which will be Monday night for the U.S. We haven’t been told much about the first face-to-face meeting between a sitting U.S. president and a North Korean leader but may get more as the summit gets closer.

ABC’s Jordyn Phelps reports from Singapore:

The White House has yet to put out an official tick-tock of the president’s meetings with North Korean dictator Kim Jong Un, but two meetings are expected.

Following Trump and Kim’s choreographed first handshake, there is expected to be an initial meeting of a very small group of people. The meeting could even be as intimate as a direct one-on-one between Trump and Kim, with only their translators in attendance. At most, Secretary of State of Pompeo will accompany President Trump in this first encounter.

There will then be a second expanded bilateral meeting at which the fuller U.S. and North Korean delegations are expected to be present.

Both Trump and Kim, who arrived earlier Sunday, are staying in hotels less than half a mile apart. And the White House says that on the flight to Singapore the president spent time meeting with his staff, reading materials and preparing for his meeting with Kim. Joining him are Pompeo, National Security Advisor John Bolton and chief of staff John Kelly and National Security Advisor John Bolton. White House press secretary Sarah Sanders is on the trip as well and we can expect to hear from her at some point.

On the president’s schedule for Monday is a meeting around noon with Singapore’s Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong and then in the afternoon a meet and greet at the U.S. Embassy.

Kim, meanwhile, arrived in Singapore with his younger sister, Kim Yo Jong, and Kim Yong Chol, the senior adviser who visited Trump at the White to hand-deliver a letter from Kim a little more than a week ago when the summit was still in doubt about Trump abruptly canceled it.

The Singapore negotiation follows months of speculation and high-stakes meetings, starting with the revelation in April that then-CIA Director Mike Pompeo secretly met with Kim in North Korea.

There was the moment when South Korean President Moon Jae-in and Kim embraced each other at the Demilitarized Zone, and more recently, the photo of senior North Korean official Kim Yong Chol hand-delivering a letter from Kim Jong Un to Trump in the Oval Office, which the president called “very positive.”

And there were bumps along the way. North Korea balked at National Security Adviser John Bolton and Vice President Mike Pence’s invocation of the “Libya model” when both were separately asked about the U.S.’s options should a deal not be struck, which led Trump to briefly cancel the entire summit in late May, citing ”open hostility” in the regime’s statement responding to those comments.

But the summit prevailed. And as journalists from around the world gather on Sentosa Island, the world watches and waits.

Check back here with us through Tuesday’s summit for updates, analysis and a peek into the moments that don’t make headlines — all as they happen.

June 10, 2018 — Trump-Kim summit: What it would take to move forward

A summit between President Donald Trump and North Korea’s Kim Jong Un was unimaginable just a few months ago.

But with that about to happen, hard questions remain about what might emerge from their historic meeting.

What are the possible outcomes that could satisfy the U.S. goal: that North Korea completely end its nuclear weapons program?

ABC News’ Luis Martinez looks at the best and worse-case scenarios that could arise from the summit.

June 10, 2018 — Trump on a ‘high-wire act without a safety net’ in meeting Kim Jong Un: Leading Democrat

The top Democrat on the Senate Foreign Relations Committee said Democrats want President Trump to succeed at his summit with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un but that the talks are “a risk” because of Trump’s apparent lack of preparation.

“The president has gone into a high-wire act without a safety net, and the preparation for this type of summit — while we applaud robust diplomacy — the preparation for this type of summit, to test the proposition of what Kim Jong Un is really willing to do or not, has not taken place,” Sen. Bob Menendez, D-N.J., told ABC News Chief Anchor George Stephanopoulos on “This Week” Sunday. “And so this is a bit of a risk.”

The Democratic senator added, “A meeting, as I have said, and a deal is not the hardest part. It’s getting the right deal at the end of the day.”

Read more about Sen. Mendendez’s other comments here, from ABC News’ Kelsey Walsh.

June 10, 2018 — Only 2 options on North Korea, ‘peace or war’: Top Republican senator

Sen. Lindsey Graham of South Carolina told ABC News Chief Anchor George Stephanopoulos on “This Week” Sunday that there are ultimately three possible outcomes to President Trump’s negotiations with North Korea’s Kim Jong Un: “Peace, where we have a win-win solution; military force where they — we devastate the North Korean regime and stop their program by force; or to capitulate like we’ve done in the past.”

Graham continued, “Donald Trump is not going to capitulate, so there’s really only two options — peace or war.”

ABC News’ Molly Nagle writes about Sen. Graham’s other comments on “This Week” here.

Jun 10, 2018, 11:29 AM ET — Trump arrives in Singapore

Aboard Air Force One, the president touched down at Singapore’s Paya Lebar Air Base at 8:21 p.m. local time and was greeted by Singaporean Foreign Minister Vivian Balakrishnan.

Trump, wearing a dark suit and blue tie, got to Singapore several hours after Kim Jong Un arrived. He waved as he emerged from Air Force One and briefly spoke with Balakrishnan and other dignitaries on hand.

Asked by reporters how he was feeling, Trump said, “very good” before getting into his presidential limousine and departing the airport for the Shangri-La Hotel, where he and his entourage will stay.

PHOTO: President Donald Trump walks off Air Force One as he arrives at the Paya Lebar Air Base in Singapore, June 10, 2018.Jim Lo Scalzo/EPA-EFE via REX/Shutterstock
President Donald Trump walks off Air Force One as he arrives at the Paya Lebar Air Base in Singapore, June 10, 2018.

Read more about Trump’s arrival and the events leading up to it here, from ABC News’ Morgan Winsor and Bill Hutchinson.

Jun 10, 2018, 7:05 AM ET — Kim Jong Un arrives in Singapore

North Korean leader Kim Jong Un arrived in Singapore just before 3 p.m. local time ahead of a much-anticipated summit with President Donald Trump on Tuesday.

Kim landed at Singapore Changi International Airport and was greeted by Singapore’s Minister of Foreign Affairs Vivian Balakrishnan.

Balakrishnan shared official photos of a smiling Kim deplaning from the Air China jet and shaking hands. Kim’s entourage flew to Singapore on three jets: the first carried vehicles and supplies; the second, an Air China Boeing 747 used for high-level officials, carried Kim; and a third, Kim’s personal jet, carried his sister Kim Yo Jong.

Kim Jong Un is greeted by Singapores minister for foreign affairs, Vivian Balakrishnan, upon landing in the city-state on Sunday, June 10, 2018. Twitter/@VivianBala
Kim Jong Un is greeted by Singapore’s minister for foreign affairs, Vivian Balakrishnan, upon landing in the city-state on Sunday, June 10, 2018.

Read more about Kim’s arrival here, from ABC News’ Mark Osborne and Joohee Cho.

June 10, 2018 — High stakes, tense talks, burning questions over Trump’s North Korean summit answered

It’s the first meeting between leaders of the U.S. and North Korea, which are technically still at war with one another and in a tense nuclear stand-off over North Korea’s illicit nuclear weapons program.

The meeting on Tuesday has the world on edge — will it be a breakthrough moment with two leaders uniquely suited for the moment, or will it end disastrously and inch the crisis closer to war?

“We are going to have a great success,” Trump pledged Thursday at the White House. But it’s unclear what success is to Trump –- or Kim.

What will the summit look like? What does success look like? What could derail the summit?

ABC News’ Conor Finnegan breaks down these questions here.

June 9 — Trump prepares to face seven decades of North Korean hostility

The first time Trump met Barack Obama at the White House, days after Trump’s historic win, the president-elect appeared unusually subdued, even nervous.

“We discussed a lot of different situations, some wonderful, and some difficulties,” Trump said in November 2016, after the meeting, sitting next to Obama and looking ill at ease. “I very much look forward to dealing with the president in the future, including counsel.”

PHOTO: President Barack Obama meets with President-elect Donald Trump in the Oval Office of the White House in Washington, Nov. 10, 2016. Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP Photo, FILE
President Barack Obama meets with President-elect Donald Trump in the Oval Office of the White House in Washington, Nov. 10, 2016.

Later that month Trump told The New York Times that he and Obama talked about “a big problem for the country,” which the Times later reported was most likely North Korea.

If Trump was pensive that day, he had every reason to be.

In handing over power, Obama handed Trump a huge responsibility: protect the nation from a rogue regime that has spent decades threatening to annihilate America, at the very moment when North Korea might finally have the means to make good on the threat.

Since that meeting, Trump has been less gracious, repeatedly blaming not just Obama but all presidents who have struggled with North Korea for allowing the problem to fester.

“North Korea is a situation that should’ve been handled 25 years ago, 20 years ago, 15 years ago, 10 years ago and five years ago,” he said in September 2017. “And it could’ve been handled much more easily, you’ve had various administrations, many administrations which left me a mess, but I’ll fix it.”

It’s a mess that’s been seven decades in the making.

Read more of this piece from ABC News’ Steve Turnham.

June 9 — Everything you need to know about North Korean leader Kim Jong Un

Kim Jong Un is the third head of state from his family’s dictatorial dynasty, one of the last inherited absolute monarchies on earth. Yet despite his unrivaled power in North Korea and his command over nuclear weapons and intercontinental ballistic missiles, remarkably little is known about him.

Van Jackson, a scholar on Korean security and an associate professor at the Asia-Pacific Center for Security Studies, told ABC News that North Korea’s secretive nature makes it hard to verify most information coming out of the country.

“Anybody who can answer all your questions with certainty has false confidence. Ask them to prove their answers and they won’t be able to,” Jackson said.

In the absence of a reliable official biography, the information publicly available about Kim reflects a “broad consensus understanding” from experts keeping a close eye on the regime, Jackson explained.

Here is what you need to know about the North Korea’s reclusive leader from ABC News’ Riley Beggin.

June 9 — Trump leaves G-7 summit sparring with Trudeau, heads to North Korea says Kim Jong Un has ‘one-time shot’

Trump said Saturday that North Korean leader Kim Jong Un has a “one-time shot” at reaching a deal with the United States.

As he embarks to Singapore for a summit with North Korea’s supreme leader, Trump said that it “is going to work out very well.”

“I really feel confident. I feel that Kim Jong Un wants to do something great for his people and he has that opportunity and he won’t have that opportunity again,” Trump said at a press briefing before leaving the G-7 meeting in Quebec.

PHOTO: Steffen Seibert posted this photo on Twitter showing world leaders at the G-7 summit on June 9, 2018, in La Malbaie, Quebec, Canada.@ RegSprecher/Twitter
Steffen Seibert posted this photo on Twitter showing world leaders at the G-7 summit on June 9, 2018, in La Malbaie, Quebec, Canada.

“I think within the first minute I’ll know” if North Korea is serious about a deal, said the president, who then touted his dealmaking abilities. “Just my touch, my feel. That’s what I do.”

Read more about Trump’s latest comments on North Korea, and his brief appearance at the G-7 meeting in Canada, from ABC’s Justin Fishel, Benjamin Siu and M.L. Nestel.

June 9 — Outside of White House, anti-nuke protesters hopeful over U.S.-North Korea summit

On the eve of a historic summit between Trump and Kim Jong Un, protesters who are part of a 37-year effort advocating for world peace and nuclear nonproliferation in front of the White House are optimistic the summit will be a step closer to global nuclear disarmament.

PHOTO: The White House Peace Vigil tent, setup in 1981, is seen near the White House, a day before the nuclear security summit on March 30, 2016 in Washington, DC.Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP/Getty Images
The White House Peace Vigil tent, setup in 1981, is seen near the White House, a day before the nuclear security summit on March 30, 2016 in Washington, DC.

Philipos Melaku-Bello is one of three consistent volunteers who sit solemnly in the midst of tourists that crowd Pennsylvania Avenue to catch a glimpse of the White House. Melaku-Bello hopes that Trump “doesn’t make anything worse” at the summit.

“So far during his administration, things have looked very upsetting,” Mekalu-Bello said. “If he can get out of this without making things worse would be the best I could expect.”

Read more about Melaku-Bello and the William Thomas Memorial Anti-Nuclear Peace Vigil from ABC News’ Karolina Rivas.

June 8 — Human rights groups honor victims of communism ahead of Trump-Kim summit

As Trump prepares for the long-awaited summit next week with the leader of one of the five communist countries left in the world, groups representing victims of communism gathered on a sunny afternoon to honor those who lost their lives under communist regimes.

PHOTO: Representatives from North Korea Freedom Coalition stands in front of the Goddess of Democracy Statue after a wreath laying ceremony, June 8, 2018 in Washington.Nataly Pak/ABC News
Representatives from North Korea Freedom Coalition stands in front of the Goddess of Democracy Statue after a wreath laying ceremony, June 8, 2018 in Washington.

“So many people were victimized. It’s a gathering to commemorate not just those killed in North Korea but all victims [of communism] around the world so of course I had to come,” said Sang Hak Park, the president of the Fighters for Free North Korea Association, who flew in from Seoul in time for the Eleventh Annual Roll Call of Nations Wreath Laying Ceremony in Washington, D.C., on Friday.

The ceremony, hosted by the Victims of Communism Memorial Foundation, assembled 61 groups representatives from 17 embassies, to remember the lives of “more than 100 million victims of communism,” according to the foundation.

One by one, each group paid respect to the victims they came to honor by laying wreath around the Goddess of Democracy statue, a replica of the statue carried by the students in China’s Tiananmen Square in 1989.

Read more about the ceremony from ABC News’ Nataly Pak.

June 6 — Singapore gears up to host Trump-Kim summit

The on-again, off-again and now on-again summit between Trump and Kim Jong Un is set for next week on a secluded island off the coast of Singapore, in southeast Asia.

Both delegations have been in the small city-state nation since the end of May preparing for the historic June 12 meeting, which the White House said Tuesday would take place at the Capella Hotel, a five-star luxury resort on Sentosa Island.

PHOTO: In this undated photo provided by Capella Singapore, an aerial view of Capella Resort Hotel is seen at Palawan Beach on Sentosa Island off the waters of Singapore.Capella Singapore via AP, FILE
In this undated photo provided by Capella Singapore, an aerial view of Capella Resort Hotel is seen at Palawan Beach on Sentosa Island off the waters of Singapore.

The American team has already set up shop at the Capella Hotel, a short drive away from the main business center of the country. Joe Hagin, the White House deputy chief of staff, has reportedly met the leader of the North Korean delegation, Kim Chang Son, at the Capella to discuss the details of the summit. The two are finalizing the security, protocol and logistical details.

The North Korean delegation has been seen coming and going from the Fullerton Hotel, an old colonial building that was once the main post office.

Read more about the Singapore locales central to this week’s meeting from ABC News’ Clark Bentson in Singapore.

May 29 — What you need to know about the possible US-North Korea summit

U.S. and North Korean officials were charging ahead with negotiations in multiple locations to set a joint agenda and lay groundwork for the June 12 summit in Singapore between Trump and Kim Jong Un.

Read about the planning process leading up to Tuesday’s summit from ABC News’ JooHee Cho, Hakyung Kate Lee, Jaesang Lee and Jiweon Park.

The seesaw relationship between North Korea and the United States

Check out this photo essay showcasing the photographs that define the tumultuous relationship between the U.S. and North Korea.

ABC News has followed the Kim regime since he took power in 2011. Read our previous reporting from ABC News’ Luis Martinez, Soyeon Kim and Haesoo Yang for more.

For all you need to know about Kim in 60 seconds check out Kim Jong Un: In a minute

What to know about North Korea and its weapons programs

Timeline of North Korea’s claimed nuclear tests

Click to Read more news from the respected source


 

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